Tips and experiences from solo female travelers who traveled independenty in South America In an age where people stay single longer, it is only logical that there will be more solo travelers, however what surprised me over the years is that I met more solo female travelers than solo male travelers. Research even shows that more than two thirds of the solo travelers are women, which is in contradiction with commonly expected behavior. In general solo male travelers are admired for their bravery and adventurous personality, while solo female travelers are often met with false judgment, concerned tones, and raised eyebrows. Popular questions include: “Are you married? Why not? When are you going to settle down, have a family, stop

Healthcare during your travels in South America Practical information about your health during your travels in South America Visiting new places means that your body has to get used to new surroundings, colder, warmer (stronger sunshine), higher altitude and different food than it is used to. For everyone this can mean something different. Some people adapt quick, others need more time, but in the end almost everyone gets used to their new surroundings. The most important thing is that you listen to your body. Take it easy the first few days and let your body slowly adapt to the new things you eat and the new surrounding you are. Be also careful with using strong medicine against diarrhea like lopromide.

Travelling to South America with Disabilities If you love to travel, but have a disability and/or special medical condition, please don’t think that you will not be able to travel. With the right preperation and experienced local help you might be able to reach places you handn’t imagined, like Inca Citadel Machu Picchu. To start with your preperations we can highly recommend having a look at the following website: More info about travelling with a Disability/ Medical condition On this website you can find information about: –    Travelling with a wheelchair –    Travelling with Cancer –    Travelling with a heart condition –    Travelling with someone with dementia –    Travelling with high blood pressure / hypertension –    Travelling abroad after a stroke –   

Altitude sickness while traveling in South America What you need to know while travelling to high altitude locations One of the things you have to be prepared for while you travel to higher altitudes in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador is altitude sickness or “soroche”.  You can’t prevent altitude sickness and it is a strange kind of disease that everyone can get; no matter their age or even physical condition. To complicate matters, even the effects of high altitude sickness aren’t always the same. Some people already feel weak at an altitude of a 1000 m, others only above the 3000 m altitude. In general most people feel the symptomes of altitude sickness when they are above 2500 m altitude and/or